Tag Archives: Vatted Malt

Compass Box Phenomenology

Along with No Name I reviewed yesterday, there was another interesting and engimatic Compass Box release coming out last year called Phenomenology with the slogan “Phenomenology – There’s No Right or Wrong”.

Phenomenology is a school of thought in psychology that focuses on
phenomena, or, the experiences that we get from our senses–what we
see, taste, smell, etc. It is a way of thinking about ourselves and the
very personal, subjective nature of experience.

True to its name, when Phenomenology was initially released, it was an enigmatic whisky with no recipe nor official tasting notes released, but it’s been months since the release and by now we do have the recipe information:

It doesn’t happen too often that you get to see Glenlossie and Tamdhu as the main ingredients of a whisky costing £150.

Compass Box Phenomenology (46%, 7908 btls, £143/€147.5)

Nose: Fruity pears, apples, salt and subtle peat smoke, sweet oak spices, fizzy minerals, sour hard candies.

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Compass Box No Name Review

When Compass Box released No Name last October, there was a lot of buzz around it. It is the peatiest whisky ever from Compass Box with 75.5% of it hailing from Ardbeg. Take into account that the Ardbeg portion carries an unpublished but still obtainable (via email) age statement that wasn’t seen from indie Ardbegs in ages (although recently a few indie Ardbegs popped up with similar age) and you can see why people were enamored by it. And let’s not forget the sexy black presentation and the added wink in the form of the ‘No Name’ name.

So the large portion in this blended whisky, 75.5% comes from Ardbeg (from re-charred barrels,) 10.6% comes from Caol Ila (refill barrels), 13.4% from Clynelish (re-charred hogsheads) and measly 0.5% of Compass box Highland malt blend (which is 60% Clynelish and 20% of both Dailuaine and Teaninich) finished in Compass Box’s heavy toasted French Oak hybrid cask for 6 months.

15,000 bottles were produced, bottled at 48.9% without added color or chill filtering.

Compass Box No Name (48.9%, £98.00/€98,90)

Nose: Very clean peat, lemon and lime, lots of smoke and a bit of tar. Quite fatty with oil wax, fruitiness lead by pears, red apples and some peaches. Continue reading

Douglas Laing Yula Trilogy (20, 21 & 22 Year Old) Review

Yula, a Norse Goddess (according to Douglas Laing), was the character that sprang to life a trilogy of aged blended malt whiskies releases over the span of 3 years. This is what we’re told on Yula:

Ancient Islay legend has it that a beautiful Norse goddess – Yula – embarked on a long
journey searching for her long lost love with an apron full of pebbles. The stones fell out as
she travelled, forming a string of islands and leaving behind a trail of her thankless pursuit.
Tragic Yula never did find her love, but perished in the turbulent seas surrounding Islay
which was the last jewel-shaped stone to fall from her apron. It’s here on Islay, which in old
Norse means “Yula’s Isle”, that Douglas Laing’s heroine is buried, her final resting place
marked by two standing stones that can still be seen to this day.

The first edition, Yula 20 Years Old was launched back in October 2015. The second chapter, Yula 21 Years Old was launched in September 2016 and the latest and last chapter, Yula 22 Years Old was released last September and now it’s the time to review them all.

Each edition has 900 bottles, wasn’t chill filtered nor colored and bottled at natural cask strength that went down a bit during the last two years from 52.6% for the first chapter to 51.2% of the third and last chapter.

 Douglas Laing Yula 20 Year Old (Chapter 1) (52.6%)

Nose: Gentle sweet smoke, lemony spiciness, peaches and apricots, dusty & mineraly, weak smoldering coals smoke, pastry dough.
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Big Peat Christmas 2017 Limited Edition Review

I’ve realized that once again life and work consumes most of my time in the last few weeks, leaving almost no free time to work on the blog. But I think that going for a quick and down to earth review mode may help building the momentum again.

Let’s get festive with the latest Douglas Laing Christmas Edition of Big Peat. This series has been going for a few years already and always provided a good value.

Big Peat Christmas 2017 (54.1%, £53.95/€52,95)

Nose: Young and malty. Then sweet peat with gentle smoke, honey, some Ardbeg fruitiness,  pears. Getting smokier after a while with newly developed ashes note. Continue reading

Rock Oyster 18 Year Old Review

A quick review for Sunday as you’re either slumbering as part of your weekend rituals or you’re swamped with work after getting back to work. Either way, here’s something real nice to end/start the week – a review of Rock Oyster 18 Year Old.

Rock Oyster 18 is a limited edition in the Islands blended malts series from Douglas Laing. It was released along with Timorous Beastie 18 (reviewed here) and it contains whiskies from Arran, Orkney, Jura and Islay. As usual it’s non chill-filtered and without colouring.

Rock Oyster 18 Year Old (46.8%, £72.50/€76,99)

Nose: Soft, starting with salt, meat, seaweed, honey and then then peat and bonfire smoke, a bit of tar, very maritime! Continue reading

Timorous Beastie 18 Year Old Review

Today’s review is the forth and latest release under the ‘Timorous Beastie’ label from Douglas Laing, the Timorous Beastie 18 Year Old that was released last May. We’ll review this today and next week we’ll check out both the 21 year old and the 40 year old that were released last year.

Timorous Beastie is Douglas Laing label for highlands blended malt. In this case, It’s a vatting of whiskies from Blair Athol, Dalmore,  Glengoyne and Glen Garioch. A quite large batch of 7258 bottles was produced with a bit of an uneven pricing where it’s noticeably cheaper in mainland Europe than in UK. As usual with Douglas Laing, it’s non chill-filtered and without colouring.

Timorous Beastie 18 Year Old (46.8%, £74.50/€67,90)

Nose: Malty, damp wood shows up at first but is waved away later on, honey, pie dough and frankly, it’s quite bready. White pepper, subdued creamy fruitiness and apples and it developed a mineral edge after a few minutes Continue reading

Compass Box Spice Tree Extravaganza Review

A bit late but better now than never, here’s my review on Compass Box Spice Tree Extravangaza that was released a while ago.

This is a special edition to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Compass Box’s regular Spice Tree. In short, they use the same concept but used older whisky and with added sherry cask influence. As you can see from the ingredients list below, it’s 60% Clynelish, 20% Dailuaine and 20% Teaninch. If you want to know how old is each whisky, just go to the official page here and press the “Request Recipe” button, but I will tell you this is not a young whisky.

 

Compass Box Spice Tree Extravaganza (46%, £92.45/€114,95/$89.99)

Nose: Balanced but also spicy with vanilla topping. Then freshness, fragrance and rich body, getting sweeter, some dryness and wine tannins, dried berries, somewhat dusty. After a while sweeter and stronger red fruity notes, a dash of dried orange peels. Lovely nose! Continue reading